November 6th we pulled up anchor at 4:15 am determined that we would make Cabo San Lucas during daylight the next day. We picked our way through a bay full of boats, darn those who don’t have their anchor lights on. It was a beautiful day but no wind. Richard caught a yellowfin tuna early in the morning so fresh tuna sashimi for lunch 🙂 Mid afternoon we all had a bit of a scare as a boat in the fleet came over with a Mayday that one of their crew was having a seizure. There were two doctors, a nurse, and EMT among the fleet so a doctor was able to help the captain. I must say the captain of that boat handled himself very calmly in a very scary situation. It really brings home how isolated you are on the ocean and is the number one reason many cruisers do the Baja Ha Ha. When you are sailing 700+ miles along a desolate shoreline, it is nice having 135 other boats with you. I’m happy to say that the crew member got to a doctor when they docked in Cabo and was reported to be doing fine.

After a brilliant sunset and the rise of a full moon, we crossed the Tropic of Cancer at the stroke of midnight on November 7th. We were now officially in the tropics. But with our weather getting warmer each day, we didn’t need no stinking chart to tell us that. I was no longer wearing a sweatshirt during my night watches! I came on watch at 4:00 am that morning excited to see Cabo San Lucas and watch the sunrise. Adding to the excitement was a cruise ship passing less than 1 nm off our starboard side. A bit close but I got a good view of how large it is. Anchor down at 8:45 am during daylight. After nearly 11 days we arrived. Let the celebration begin!

Richard's catch.  A yellowfin tuna.  Sashimi for lunch!

Richard’s catch. A yellowfin tuna. Sashimi for lunch!

You know you reached Cabo when you see the arches

You know you reached Cabo when you see the arches

Celebrating our arrival in Cabo San Lucas

Celebrating our arrival in Cabo San Lucas